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Unsolved, Suspicious Deaths on Las Vegas Boulevard

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Sin City is a global tourism destination, and a number of less than pleasant facts go with that title. Sure, there’s the impracticality of building a huge city in the middle of a barren desert, and that ecological oversight is always on the radar of Las Vegas lawmakers as the water table continues to dip lower and lower. Another unfortunate side effect of a healthy tourism industry is an overactive undertaker. In 2014, Las Vegas recorded more than 40 million visitors, and about 1,100 of those guests never made it out of Nevada . The Clark County coroner estimates that about 67 percent of those deaths were the result of accidents, 15 percent were suicides and 11 percent were homicides. Then, there’s the more mysterious deaths, which draw the attention of conspiracy theorists and would-be sleuths from around the globe. No cause of death is determined in about six percent of the deaths in Las Vegas.

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Right about now, you’re probably wondering how so many deaths could go unsolved. Some of that blame has to be attributed to local hotel owners. According to industry sources, hotel staffs are directed to relocate the body whenever they stumble upon a guest who’s passed away. There’s a very practical reason for this directive, as creepy as it may sound. If a corpse is discovered in a hotel room by authorities, the room must be quarantined for a minimum of two weeks. For anyone whose stayed a few nights on the Strip, it’s easy to see why hotels wouldn’t want to pass up that revenue. A quick move of the body by a few intrepid souls on the hotel staff, and the quarantine is no longer required. Forget about those crime shows and preserving the integrity of the crime scene. Cash is king in Las Vegas, so unsolved mysteries are commonplace.

Let’s take a trip into the dark side of Las Vegas and recount a few of the most well-known suspicious deaths in the world’s premier casino destination. If you’ve got one of those fancy Sherlock Holmes hats, now would be the time to put it on.

The Laundry Chute Suicide

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Just last month, a California woman fell 15 stories to her death in Las Vegas. This was no plunge from the top of a building or fall out a window, however. Kalli Medina-Brown was found unresponsive in a third-floor laundry collection area. When firefighters discovered the young woman’s body, they immediately alerted the local police, stating that the death seemed ‘suspicious’. Police seem to be less convinced by the evidence, though, as they quickly determined that there was no evidence to suggest foul play in the case. Within just two days, the case was closed, and those close to the victim were left struggling to find answers. Was it a simple accident, or was there something more sinister afoot? As the case currently stands, we’re unlikely to get real answers.

According to news outlets, Medina-Brown was in Vegas with her husband and friends to celebrate her 27th birthday. Near midnight, security camera captured her walking away from her husband into the maid’s closet. The victim’s grandfather, Tony Fratis, added fuel to the speculation when he told detectives that there was ‘no way it was suicide’. “Everybody goes to Vegas to have fun,” he told KTNV. “There’s no way it was suicide. There’s no way in the world.”

A Fateful Plunge

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Believe it or not, Las Vegas is sometimes referred to as the Suicide Capital of America due to the high rates of suicide recorded among both residents and visitors. For that reason, the fact that an individual takes his or her own life in Sin City is far from suspicious. However, in 2000, a particularly noteworthy suicide had some people calling foul. In January of that year, a 24-year-old Utah man jumped from the top of the 1,149-foot Stratosphere Tower. Jumping off the Stratosphere to your doom is no easy task. According to the hotel’s vice president of marketing at the time, the man had to climb over a four foot tall railing and drop about 10 feet onto a second deck. Then, he had to climb a second 10-foot high fence. The hotel always keeps a security guard on hand to watch the area, so the fact that Mitchell M. Mayfield was able to bypass all of the safety features unimpeded is suspicious. Adding to the mystery, the casino’s staff claimed that little would be done to change security measures after the incident. Was it a simple suicide or something darker? With more than 15 years having passed since the tragic event, it appears nothing more will be uncovered from this fateful plunge.

Deaths happen all the time in Las Vegas. Finding information on these deaths, however, is difficult. The image of a city that’s jam-packed with happiness and excitement is one that major players on the Sin City casino scene spend billions to maintain. Don’t believe us? Try finding reports of a death in a hotel room on the Strip. They simply don’t exist, despite the fact that we know these deaths happen. The result is a world of mystery and suspicions that can’t be verified or disproven. Call it a conspiracy theory, or take the facts at face value. In either case, there’s more to Las Vegas than meets the eye. That much is for certain. If the mysterious deaths rub you the wrong way, there’s a way to enjoy all of your favorite casino games from the security of your own home. Head on over to Prism Casino, home of a huge selection of awesome games, some of the best promotional offers in the industry and true VIP customer service. We’re happy to report that there’s never been a suspicious death at our online casino, but there’s been plenty of big time wins and bankroll-boosting performances. Sign up now, and let’s get the games underway. Whether you prefer slots or table games, we’ve got you covered.

Gemma Sykes

Gemma is not only a great game player who enjoys casino halls, she is also a great jazz dancer. She has a very keen interest in the way things work, her curiosity got her a job on online gambling industry as a writer. Always looking for new and fun ways to do things and still have time for the spotlight.